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Kasatochi 2008
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  Summary: On Aug. 7, 2008, Alaska's Kasatochi volcano erupted, hurling more than a million tons of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere. This produced unusually colorful sunrises and sunsets around the northern hemisphere for months. Purple is one of the telltale colors of a volcanic sunset. Fine volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere scatter blue light which, when mixed with ordinary sunset red, produces a violet hue. Other signs to look for include a bright yellow "twilight arch" and long crepuscular rays and shadows.
 
  Photographer, Location Images Comments


Dan Bush,
Albany, Missouri
Aug. 24, 2008
#1, more

About 20 minutes after sunset this display of crepuscular rays appeared in the west with great contrast and color. The display was caused by clouds in Nebraska and points west casting their shadows on the sky towards me here in Missouri. The display lasted only a few minutes. Taken with a Nikon D70 camera and 12mm lens with a 1/40th second exposure.


Pete Glastonbury,
Devizes, Wiltshire.UK
Oct. 26, 2008
#1

After sunset tonight I saw a lovely purple colour in the western sky for around 15 minutes. Could this be lingering aerosols from Alaska's Kasatochi volcano? Camera, Pentax IST DL 18mm lens ASA 100, F8 259th shutter speed.


Marco Langbroek,
Leiden
Aug. 29, 2008
#1

Evening twilight of 29 August 2008 was conspicuously purple in the Netherlands. This was due to volcanic dust in the stratosphere, spewed by the August 7 eruption of the Kasatochi volcano in the Aleutians. Photo shows the Leiden Observatory in the background. Canon EOS 450D + Tamron AF Di II 17-50/2.8 SP, 1/100s at F2.8 & 200 ISO


Marek Nikodem,
Szubin, Poland
Sep. 8, 2008
#1, #2, #3, #4, more

The volcanic sky show continues over Poland. Last night (after sunset) in Szubin, Poland I observed symetric rays crossing on the sky. It was wonderful and fantastic! Nikon D50, 200 ASA, 1/15-1/50 sek


Didier Van Hellemont,
Horebeke, Belgium
Sep. 2, 2008
#1, more

Very bright colors at sunset, due to the aerosols of the Kasatochi volcano. A very impressive sight, also thanks to the passing clouds.


Doug Zubenel,
At home near De Soto, Kansas.
Sep. 4, 2008
#1

A cold front moved through our area during the past 24 hrs, leaving very clear skies at sunset. The aerosols from Kasatochi, however, were in great evidence, painting the twilight sky pink and orange! Canon Rebel XTi with a 24mm Nikkor lens @ f/5.6; 1/10th second exposure at ISO 100.


Stephen O'Meara,
Volcano, Hawaii
Nov. 19, 2008
#1

After sunset, the skies cleared suddenly and rapidly in the wake of a strong rain storm. In the clearing twilight, I saw Venus and Jupiter hovering over the bright colors of a Kasatochi sunset with cirrus clouds reddened by the volcanic aerosol glow and the plume from the erupting Kilauea volcano silhouetted against it! Then, as twilight deepened, the bright planets tickled the Milky Way in Sagittarius, which rose above the tree tops like smoke from a campfire.

more images (Oct. 24): S Mexico;