The 2004 Transit of Venus
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Summary: Every 120 years or so a dark spot glides across the Sun. Small, inky-black, almost perfectly circular, it's no ordinary sunspot. Not everyone can see it, but some who do get the strangest feeling, of standing, toes curled in the damp sand, on the beach of a South Pacific isle.... Get the full story from Science@NASA.

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Unless otherwise stated, all images are copyrighted by the photographers.


  Photographer, Location Images Comments

Tomas Maruska,
in the village of Stupava, north of Bratislava, Slovakia, latitude 4815'29' N longitude 1701'39' E
Jun. 08, 2004
#1, more

This image shows the International Space Station and Venus transiting the Sun at the same time. The event was visible inside a narrow corridor (only a few hundred meters wide) stretching across Slovakia.

Photo details: Lens: Rubinar 5.6/500 + Baader Astro Solar filter, camera: WebcamPhilips TouCam Pro, Guiding: Vixen GPDX, Exposition: 1/10 000 s at frame rate 30images/sec.

Duane Clausen,
Menominee, MI
Jun. 08
#1

Just for fun: Five out of six of these dark spots are a flock of birds, one is not. Can you find the planet?

Tom Murdic,
Paducah, Kentucky
Jun. 08
#1

Seen through lots of turbulent atmosphere at sunrise, Venus seems to boil! Photo details: 1/80th of a sec. exposure time using an Olympus 4000Z digital camera set at 100 ISO coupled to a Questar 3.5 with no solar filter.

Ric Parkin,
Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy
Jun. 08
#1, #2,

Low tech on holiday - 10x25mm binoculars, a piece of paper, and great architecture.

Paul Howell, George Whitney, Kirk Rogers,
Cornish, Maine USA
Jun. 08
#1, more

Venus transit photographed in hydrogen-alpha light using an SBIG STL-11000 camera and and Astro-Physics 155EDF telescope shortly after sunrise.

Mark Keech,
Otford, New South Wales, Australia
Jun. 08
#1

Details: Olympus C750UZ at maximum optical zoom and using a #13 welder's mask filter.

David Hazen,
Near Boston, MA
Jun. 08
#1, #2, more

Photos of the Venus transit were taken with my Nikon Coolpix 8700 digital camera and my Meade ETX-125 telescope.

Alan C Tough,
Elgin, Moray, Scotland
Jun. 08
#1, #2

Thick, but fast moving, cloud covered Northern Scotland all morning. I waited patiently and the cloud momentarily thinned enough to allow me to witness and photograph the transit. Exposure was 1/1600 Sec @ f/16 and ISO 100 equivalent film speed.

Mike Coward,
Bucasia, nr Mackay, North Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Jun. 08
#1, #2, #3

An old 115cm reflector was adorned with a projection device constructed of bamboo sticks held together with rubber bands, wrapped in cheap black cloth and with a white card screen stapled to the end. The whole event was watched till sunset whereupon flocks of whistling ducks could be seen flying across the image of the Sun and Venus as they landed in the swamp for the night. Photos were taken by a hand-held digital camera (with bottle of beer in the other hand as a counter-balance)

Olivier Schreurs,
Nandrin , Belgium , Europe
Jun. 08
#1, #2, #3

Where is the black drop? The black drop effect was expected twice and unvisible twice--both in eyepiece and on the pc monitor even after webcam movies processes (20 stacked frames each). Was the old Unitron 102mm f/15refractor 'too good' ,the seeing and focus too favourable ? Vision of luminous atmospheric crescent absolutely dramatic in eyepiece of course even a little for the Toucam.

Mike O'Leary,
Vatican Observatory, Castel Gandolfo, Summer residence of the Pope
Jun. 08
#1

Mike O'Leary, on the other hand, saw the black drop effect clearly. Details: Canon 10D mounted on a Celestron C-5 telescope. "Amazing sight," says Mike.

more: from Ulrike Haug near Stuttgart, Germany; from David Crawford at The Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London; a movie from Sander Klieverik of Denekamp, the Netherlands; from Doug Askew at Chestnut Ridge Metro Park near Columbus, Ohio; from some sky watchers in Hong Kong; from David Le Conte of Guernsey, Channel Islands; from Dave Massey of Wilmslow, Cheshire, United Kingdom; from Jean Guimond of Quebec city, Quebec, Canada; from Geoff Sims of Sydney, Australia; from Quanzhi Ye of Dalingshan, Guangzhou, China; from Richard F Malone of Wilbraham , MA; from Robert Lenz on Jones Beach in St Catharines, Ontario, Canada; from Shane Finnigan of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; from Tony Surma-Hawes at the lighthouse at Vlamingh Head near Exmouth, Western Australia.

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